Dr. Warren’s blogger articles on remediation.

Dyslexia: Understanding and Remediating Auditory Processing Skills

Although there are a number of cognitive processing deficits that can cause a diagnosis of dyslexia or a reading disability, challenges with auditory processing tend to be the prevailing cause for many struggling readers.  However, many of the terms used to describe these core problems can be confusing.  In fact, wading through a comprehensive testing report can be overwhelming, because they are packed with complex cognitive and remedial terminology.  In this blog, I hope to unscramble the tangle of terms associated with auditory processing.
What are Some Key Terms One Should Understand?
  1. Auditory Processing:  Auditory processing is the brain’s interpretation of the sounds we hear. A difficulty or delay with auditory processing is not an issue with hearing, but with the understanding of what is heard.  It’s a complex operation that involves auditory synthesis, auditory closure, auditory sequencing, auditory discrimination, segmenting and auditory memory.  
  2. Auditory Synthesis or Auditory Blending: The ability to pull together individual sounds to form words.
  3. Auditory Closure: The ability to fill in any missing sounds to decode a word.  For example, this may involve understanding what someone with a foreign accent maybe saying when they delete a sound or two in a word.
  4. Auditory Sequencing: The ability to properly order language sounds in words or sentences.  For example, a child may reverse the units of sound so that when they say the word animal it comes out “aminal.”
  5. Auditory Discrimination: The ability to recognize differences between sounds.  For example, some students may struggle hearing the difference between the short “e” and “a” sounds.
  6. Segmenting: The ability to break a word into individual sounds or phonemes.
  7. Auditory Memory: The ability to remember what is heard.
  8. Phonological Processing: The ability
    to detect and discriminate a broad awareness of sounds including rhyming words, alliterations, syllables, blending sounds into words, as well as deleting or substituting sounds.
  9. Phonemes: The tiny units of sound that make up speech – such as the letter sounds.
  10. Phonemic Awareness: The ability to hear, identify, and manipulate individual sounds – also known as phonemes.  This, for example, includes the ability to detect the first sound, middle sound and end sound in a word.
  11. Phonics: A method of teaching reading by pairing sounds with letters or groups of letters.  It is the process of mapping speech into print.
  12. Receptive Language:  The ability to understand the language that we input, including
    both words and gestures. 
How Can These Difficulties be Remediated?
  1. Use an Orton-Gillingham, phonics based reading program that offers activities that strengthen auditory processing.  One of my favorite programs is Nessy Reading and Spelling.  There are many programs available, and our friends at the Dyslexia Reading Well offer a great review of the different programs.
  2. Build core cognitive skills through games and remedial activities.  Here is a great bundle of cognitive exercises at Good Sensory Learning
  3. Integrate fun activities that help students to practice the needed skills.  Check out the Reading Gamesfollowing Directions Activities and other fun reading publications at Good Sensory Learning.
I hope you found this helpful.  I would love to hear your thoughts.

Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to: www.goodsensorylearning.com, www.dyslexiamaterials.com www.learningtolearn.biz  

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Remediating Dyslexia with Orton Gillingham Based Reading Games

Students with dyslexia and other language-based learning disabilities often learn differently and require an alternative approach to learning basic reading.  What’s more, these young learners are working full tilt while sitting in the classroom and by the time they get home and have to complete their homework, they are mentally spent.  As a result, tagging on remedial reading lessons to a cup that is already overflowing can be enough to turn these kids off to learning altogether.

How Do We Help These Students Learn the Core Skills Needed to be Successful Readers?

  1. First, use a remedial program that is backed by time, testimonials and research.  The Orton-Gillingham approach to reading is a well-established and researched approach that offers a multisensory, sequential, incremental, cumulative, individualized, and explicit approach.  There are many programs that are available.  Click here to learn about a selection of these programs. 
  2. Second, employ an individualized approach as each student has unique challenges and gaps in knowledge.  If you need to assess the areas that require remediation be sure to use an assessment tool such as the Good Sensory Learning Reading Assessment
  3. Third, the process needs to be fun and engaging.  Many programs required students to slog through boring lessons, complicated rules, and bland workbook pages. Many of these concepts can be instructed through cute memory strategies and fun activities.  You can find many fun supplemental materials here
  4. Fourth, integrate a student-created, colorful, language arts handbook or guide. Click here to learn more about this method. 
  5. Fifth, help students learn how to visualize what they are reading.  Many struggling readers do not have the cognitive space to use their mind’s eye when reading, therefore, developing this skill to automaticity is key.  To learn about the research behind visualization and learning as well as how to teach this needed skill click here.  
  6. Sixth, and most important, supplement all reading programs with card and board games that allow students to practice the concepts they are learning.  This brings the fun factor into learning and can help to nurture a love for reading.
Where Can I Find Multisensory and Fun Reading Games?
At Good Sensory Learning, we offer a large selection of downloadable card and board games that work with any Orton-Gillingham or phonics based reading program.  In addition, we have many other supplemental multisensory reading activities and materials.  In fact, we just unveiled a new website. Let me know what you think!

Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to: www.goodsensorylearning.com, www.dyslexiamaterials.com www.learningtolearn.biz  

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An Overview of the Orton-Gillingham Approach to Reading Instruction

Many parents and professionals ask me about the Orton-Gillingham approach to reading and spelling. It is a well-researched and multisensory way of teaching struggling readers.  In fact,  popular programs such as Lindamood-Bell, Wilson, Barton, Fast Forward, and Spire are all based on this incremental approach.

What is at the Heart of the Orton-Gillingham Approach?
I created the following infographic to help provide an overview of the process:

When was the Orton-Gillingham Approach Created, and Who Designed it?
The Orton-Gillingham approach has been around since the 1930’s.  It was designed by a Samuel T. Orton, neurologist and pathologist, and Anna Gillingham, an educator and psychologist.  They developed an explicit, incremental and diagnostic way to teach reading instruction for students with dyslexia.

Limitations to using Orton-Gillingham Based Programs: 
Although the programs available on the market today offer a well-sequenced, comprehensive, cookie cutter methodology of teaching reading and spelling, I find that the process can be long and arduous for some students.  Many learners don’t like completing workbooks and reading long lists of words. As a result, I suggest finding a professional that knows the Orton-Gillingham approach well and has the confidence and mastery to tailor individualized lessons for each student.  In addition, I suggest using tools that strengthen the core cognitive skills required to read and spell as well as implementing games and fun activities that make the learning process motivating and fun.  If you would like to see some of these products, Click Here.

If you have any thoughts or anecdotes about the Orton-Gillingham Approach, please share them below this post.

Here is a pinnable image:

Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to: www.goodsensorylearning.com, www.dyslexiamaterials.com www.learningtolearn.biz  


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Orton Gillingham Online Academy: An Interview with Founder Marisa Bernard

This week I am featuring an interview with Marisa Bernard the creator of the Orton Gillingham Online Academy.  Marisa is a dynamic educator and passionate learning specialist that has an expertise in serving students with dyslexia.  Marisa has made it her mission to assist children who do not fit inside the conventional box and to send them on their way feeling productive, successful, & well-equipped to lead a fruitful life.

_________
Erica: Hi Marisa!  I’m so excited to be able to share this interview with my audience.  Can you tell us more about your professional background?

Marisa: I have a Bachelor’s Degree in Psychology with a focus in cognition and learning as well as a Master’s Degree in Special Education. I have experience as an Elementary Education teacher, a Reading Specialist, and I worked on staff at the Dyslexia Institute of Indiana as both an educator and trainer of the Orton Gillingham Approach. In addition, I taught Special Education in a public school setting and have remediated countless numbers of students to grade level by using research based strategies such as the Orton Gillingham Approach. Furthermore, I am a professional member of the International Dyslexia Association, and I also received a grant through the Lilly Foundation that enabled me to travel to the highlands of Ecuador to teach English, using the Orton Gillingham Approach, to the indigenous children. 

Erica: What population of students are best served by your online training program? 

Marisa: The Orton Gillingham Online Academy serves as a resource for those who teach individuals with Dyslexia. Having said that, any student population learning the English language would find our course work and tools helpful. It is our goal to unlock the door to language acquisition for people from across the globe.

Erica: Who typically purchases your training modules?
Marisa: Parents, teachers, SLPs, tutors, school districts, paraprofessionals… Really anyone who is involved with the education of those with Dyslexia.
Erica: What are the benefits of your training program?
Marisa: The Orton-Gillingham Approach is used for those who have Dyslexia. These individuals have difficulty primarily in the areas of reading, writing, and spelling.  Often these difficulties create a learning gap in other academic areas as well.  While non-dyslexic students acquire language skills easily, those with Dyslexia need to be taught various components that make up the English language. The Orton-Gillingham Approach is most often and effectively used one-on-one, due to its prescriptive nature, as well as the fact that the lessons can be catered to each student’s individual learning needs.  Having said this, the Orton-Gillingham Approach can also be adapted to group instruction.  Please note, the Orton-Gillingham Approach has stood the test of time and has been proven effective time and time again in assisting individuals to overcome their language-based disability.
Erica: Are you creating new courses and materials?
Marisa: Absolutely! Our academy is growing and we are continuously revamping, improving and adding to our current course work to enhance the teaching/learning venue. We will be launching our Advanced Language Continuum Course April 4th and this course will cover advanced morphology & derivatives, connectives, accenting, vocabulary development, & much more. We are also launching a comprehensive multisensory Connect to Comprehension course is June. This course will cover everything needed to teach students the tools necessary for meaningful comprehension, including curriculum guides and scripted texts for multiple levels. We are also working on a comprehensive multisensory grammar course, as well as a word study seminar. The idea is to provide a holistic website that will serve to meet the needs of those with Dyslexia by offering an array of courses & resources geared toward successful remediation.
Erica: How would you like to see your academy grow over the next few years?
Marisa: The knowledge we have to share has the potential to change lives and our hope is that word of our academy travels to those who need us the most. Currently, we are servicing several countries from Singapore, Thailand, Australia, Canada to the United States & several other locations in between. As we continue to reach places with no previous exposure to language remedial tools, paths are appearing and making a difference. This is truly what we are all about.
Erica: What is the best way for people to reach you?
Marisa: The best way to reach me is via email: ogonlineacademy@gmail.com
___________
Thank you Marisa for sharing your passion, expertise and mission with all of us!  It’s been a true pleasure to get to know you better, and I wish you great success.

Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go www.goodsensorylearning.com, www.dyslexiamaterials.com www.learningtolearn.biz  

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Eight, Dyslexia Games Make All Reading Programs Fun and Memorable

Do you ever have to bribe your students with candy or stickers to entice them to read through long lists of words or complete workbook activities?  There are a multitude of phonics and Orton-Gillingham based reading programs available on the market, but so many of them place struggling readers through boring drills and activities.  I experienced the same problem.  What could I do?

I Created Games to Bring the Fun Factor into My Lessons:
Over the past few years, I created a system to make any reading program fun and motivating.  I designed and published board and card games to weave into reading lessons.  Now, my students can’t wait for their sessions, are reading more, have increased stamina and they are mastering concepts at a faster pace.  A series of three reading game publication bundles have been available and selling like hot cakes, but upon popular request, I have released a new title, Reading Games Primary.  This publication offers new games that help students master basic reading concepts such as syllables, rhyming words, short vowel sounds, ending sound blends and sight words by playing super fun and engaging card and board games.  

Tell Me More About the 8 Games:

  1. Sight Word War:  

    Sight Word War is a card game
    that helps students master sight words and practice basic alphabetizing
    skills.  

  2. Syllable Sort:  Syllable Sort is a card game that helps students master syllable divisions in words.
  3. Switch-A-Roo Reading: Switch-A-Roo Reading is a reading/writing game that helps students learn beginning, middle and ending word sounds
    as well as rhyming words. 
  4. Sole Survivor:  Sole Survivor is a board game that helps
    students master breaking words into syllables as well as beginning and ending word
    sounds.
  5. Animal Party:  Animal Party is a board game that helps students learn beginning, middle and end sounds of simple three letter words.
  6. Animal Bingo:  Animal Bingo is a board game that helps
    students master breaking words into syllables as well as beginning and ending word
    sounds.  It also develops tracking and
    counting skills.
  7. Three of A Kind Beginners:  Three of a Kind is a card game that
    helps students learn rhyming words, beginning sounds, middle sounds and ending
    sounds of simple three letter words. 
  8. Three of A Kind Intermediate:  Three of a Kind Intermediate is a card game
    that helps students master rhyming words, beginning blends, middle sounds and
    ending sounds of simple four to five letter words.  
Are There Other Reading Games?
Yes.  Reading Games Primary is my fourth bundle of reading games to be published.  In fact, I have created more than 50 different games for all levels of reading remediation.  To learn more about all of these games and even download a free sample game,  click here.


Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to www.goodsensorylearning.comwww.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz  

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Tailoring Reading Remediation for Faster Results.

There are thousands of reading remediation programs out there as well as reading specialists that can help learners master the complex task of learning to read.  However, the process can be taxing, time consuming and expensive.  In fact, many students are placed into slow and boring programs that force them to wade through a sequence of lessons, many of which are not needed and not fun.

How Can Reading Remediation be Tailored to Meet Individual Needs?
Assessing each students’ needs is imperative so that time can be used efficiently and positive results can abound quickly.   This will allow the instructor to individualize remedial goals for maximum results.

How Can Individual Needs be Assessed?
There are a number of areas that need to be evaluated to see where there are gaps in proficiency. Once you know where the problem areas lie, you can focus remediation.  Here are the areas that should be assessed.

  1. Letter: name/sound recognition
  2. Rhyming words
  3. Syllable divisions
  4. Word Blending
  5. Beginning sounds
  6. Middle sounds
  7. Ending sounds
  8. Words to sounds
  9. Drop the first sound
  10. Drop the last sound
  11. Sight words
  12. Closed syllables
  13. Open syllables
  14. Silent-E syllables
  15. Consonant LE syllables
  16. R-combination syllables
  17. Vowel combinations
  18. Syllabication
  19. Beginning blends, digraphs and trigraphs
  20. Ending blends
  21. Compound words
  22. Prefixes
  23. Suffixes
  24. Compound words

Is There A Publication That Assesses These Needed Areas?
The Good Sensory Learning Reading Assessment offers a comprehensive, 27-subtest evaluation that helps to tailor any phonics based or Orton-Gillingham reading program.  It was designed to offer reading specialists, teachers and parents an easy assessment.  The score sheet, pictured to the right, allows administrators to highlight instructional goals, and the re-administration (post-intervention) provides comparative information about the success of the intervention as well as additional needs.

If you would also like to use remedial materials that bring the fun factor into lessons, consider Reading Games, Reading Games 2, and Reading Board Games.  In addition, you can also find other great multisensory, fun reading materials at DyslexiaMaterials.com.

Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to www.goodsensorylearning.comwww.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz  
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Ten, Fun Games that Strengthen Visual Processing

Visual processing is an important cognitive skill for children to develop, and there are many fun games that help to strengthen this skill.  

What is Visual Processing and Why is it Important?
Visual processing is a visual cognitive skill that allows us to process and interpret meaning from the visual information that we see through our eyes, and it plays an important role in reading, math, and spelling.  

What Are the Cognitive Skills that Make up Visual Processing
Visual processing involves a number of cognitive components:

  1. Visual Processing Speed: the ability to process visual
    information at a rapid pace.
  2. Visual
    Scanning: 
    the ability to look at and absorb all parts of visual information
    and text.
  3. Visual Spatial
    Skills:
    the ability to mentally manipulate
    2-dimensional and 3-dimensional figures.
  4. Visual Spatial Reasoning: the ability
    to perceive the spatial relationships between objects.
  5. Visual Construction Skills: the ability to organize and
    manually manipulate spatial information to make a design.  
  6. Visual Memory: the ability to remember what is seen.
  7. Visual Motor
    Integration:
    the ability to translate visual perception into motor planning,
    sequencing, control, coordination and speed.
  8. Visual Synthesis: the ability to unite visual information into a coherent whole. 
  9. Visual Sequencing: the ability to determine or remember the order of symbols, words, or objects.
  10. Visual Closure: the ability to make sense of visual information when some of the image is missing.
  11. Visual Reasoning: the ability to find meaning and make sense out of visual information.
What Are Some Games that Can Help to Develop These Skills?
  1. Set: Set is a card game of recognition and deduction. Each card contains one of three symbols (squiggles, diamonds, ovals) in varying numbers (up to three), colors (purple, green, red), and degrees of shading. A player arranges 12 cards, face up, and all the players quickly discriminate “sets” of three cards linked by combinations of sameness or difference. This game works on visual discrimination, processing speed, reasoning, sequencing, and visual scanning.
  2. Tricky Fingers: Who can match the pattern card first?  Non-removable marbles are manipulated.  This game works on visual processing speed, motor integration, sequencing, construction skills, spatial skills, and synthesis.
  3. Spot it: Spot it is played with 55 cards, each decorated with eight symbols varying in size and orientation. The object of the game is to be the first to spot the one symbol in common between two or more cards. This game works on visual processing speed, scanning, motor integration, discrimination and memory.
  4. Logic Links: Each puzzle is comprised of a series of clues that instruct the player where to place colored chips to solve a puzzle. This game works on visual reasoning, sequencing, and visual scanning.
  5. Blokus: The goal of this game is for players to fit all of their pieces onto the board. The player who gets rid of all of their tiles first is the winner. This game works on visual motor integration, reasoning, sequencing, construction skills, spatial skills, and synthesis.
  6. Pixy Cubes: Pixy Cubes uses challenge cards for players to match or they can design colorful pictures with 16 colorful cubes.  This game works on visual motor integration, memory, processing speed, spatial reasoning, sequencing, construction skills, spatial skills, and synthesis.
  7. Q-Bits: Q-bitz will challenge your visual agility. Players puzzle over how to quickly recreate the patterns on the game cards using their set of 16 cubes. This game works on visual motor integration, processing speed, spatial reasoning, sequencing, construction skills, spatial skills, and synthesis.
  8. Q-Bits Extreme: This is the same game as Q-Bits, but the cubes are not all the same and the puzzles are more challenging. This game works on visual motor integration, processing speed, spatial reasoning, sequencing, construction skills, spatial skills, and synthesis.
  9. Blink: Blink is a quick game where two players race to be the first to use all their cards. Players quickly match cards by the shape, count, or color on the cards. The first player out of cards wins.  This works on visual processing speed, discrimination and scanning.





I hope you found this helpful.  If you know of other card or board games that you find benefit visual processing, please share them below.  


Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to www.goodsensorylearning.comwww.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz  
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Kinesthetic Reading Remediation

Many students struggle with reading and the learning process can become discouraging and difficult.  However, integrating kinesthetics as well as other ways of learning can make the process both enjoyable and memorable.

Mastering the Vocabulary
One common problem is mastering the vocabulary behind reading. Words like syllable, vowel, and consonant are abstract terms for many young learners and without an understanding of and recognition of these distinctions, students build their knowledge on a weak foundation.


How Can You Teach the Terms in a Multisensory Fashion?
The last two weeks, I video taped a couple sessions with one of my students and then created a short YouTube video.   In these lessons, we tapped into all 12 ways of learning and as you can she, her enthusiasm is contagious.  The process addressed the following modalities:

  1. Visual
  2. Auditory
  3. Tactile
  4. Kinesthetic
  5. Sequential
  6. Simultaneous
  7. Reflective
  8. Verbal
  9. Interactive
  10. Direct Experience
  11. Indirect Experience
  12. Rhythmic/Melodic

Here is a link to our YouTube video or view is below. I hope you enjoy it and also integrate the ideas into your own lessons.

If you like the bouncy chairs, they are called Zenergy Ball Chairs:
Safco Products Zenergy Ball Chair, Black


Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multi-sensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials. She is also the director of Learning to Learn, in Ossining, NY.  

Working Memory, Hemisphere Integration and Attention Building Activities

Successful learners are fully engaged, can
maintain attention and they activate both hemispheres of their brain.  However, many young learners go through their
daily classroom activities without being fully conscious of the task at
hand.  They are constantly distracted by
external stimuli as well as their own internal thoughts that take them on
“little trips” outside of the classroom. 
Although their bodies are present, their minds are elsewhere.  What’s more, when these students eventually
become consciously involved in the classroom, many have missed important
instruction and they may only be activating the dominant side of their
brain.  So, for example, if a student is
only using the right hemisphere, reading can become a difficult task, as for
most
people, the left hemisphere of
the brain is dominant for language.  For
students that fall into this profile, learning can become difficult, frustrating
and taxing.   

What Can We Do to Help Students Improve Memory, Activate Their Whole Brain and Improve Attention?

The key to developing these skills lies in improving three areas of cognition:
  1. Working memory
  2. Hemispheric Integration 
  3. Attention

What is Working Memory?

According
to Google definitions, working memory is the part of short-term memory that is concerned with immediate,
conscious, perceptual and linguistic processing.  The development of working memory is
fundamental to helping students to be present and mindful while in the
classroom.  It also helps them to encode
information as well as perform mental manipulations.

What is Hemispheric Integration? 

Hemispheric Integration is the activation of both
the left and right hemispheres of the brain. 
When hemisphere integration is poor, there is decreased communication
between the right and left sides of the brain. 
Electrically, the two hemispheres
are not communicating, there is an imbalance between the right and left sides of the brain or one
hemisphere is activated, while the other remains largely inactive.   Multisensory integration is essential for almost every activity that we
perform because the combination of multiple sensory inputs is essential for us
to comprehend our surroundings.  Dan Seigal (see link below) suggests, “A healthy and productive mind “emerges
from a process called integration.”  Both Dennison (see link below) and Hannaford
(see link below) offer
physical activities that integrate the brain through movement, but this
publication offers quick printable activities that can also activate both
hemispheres and train the brain to be mindful and present for improved memory
and processing.

What are Attention Building Activities? 

Attention building activities require students to maintain attention in order to complete the exercise. Without being fully focused, the drills are virtually impossible.  If instructors or learning specialists slowly increase the number of activities that the student completes in a single session, they will be training the brain to concentrate over longer and longer periods of time. 

Why I Created and Use These Activities with My Students? 

We
live in a society that is constantly bombarding children with stimuli to the
point that when there is no stimulation, many kids get bored.  In addition, many children do not know how to
activate their own cognition and take control of their own thought
processes.   I
created these fun, game-like activities to help students become mindfully
present, develop working memory, engage both hemispheres of the brain and improve
the capacity to sustain attention.  Many
of the activities were created with the Stroop Effect in mind.  The
effect is named after John Ridley Stroop who first researched
and published the effect in England in 1935.  Later, his findings inspired a test,
The Stroop Test.  The Stroop Test is
purported to measure selective
attention, cognitive flexibility, processing speed, and
executive functions.  If you would like to learn more about these activities as well as see some sample pages, Click Here




Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to www.goodsensorylearning.com, www.dyslexiamaterials.com, www.learningtolearn.biz  
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Fun Clothespin Orton Gillingham Remediation Ideas and More

Incorporating the fun factor can help to
make any difficult lesson enjoyable. 
I found these cute, little, painted clothespins on Ebay, and I think it
will take my lessons to a whole new level.  I have color coded the vowels and consonants as well as the digraphs. There are so many ways I can use these clothespins to enhance my lessons!

It will enhance my lessons for a number
of reasons:

  • Using these cute, colorful, mini clothespins that measure only 1 1/2 inches by 1/2 an
    inch will surely engage my learners.
  • Opening and closing
    clothespins also helps to develop fine motor skills.
  • Color-coding the letters can help the children differentiate between vowels and
    consonants.
  • Color-coding the letters can also help students discriminate between the different types
    of syllables.  If you look at the image above, the first two words are closed syllables, the third word is an open syllable, and the final word is a silent-e syllable.
  • Placing
    digraphs on a single clothespin helps the kids to remember that the two letters
    only make one sound. 
What are some
other possibilities?

  • You can store them in color-coded, up-cycled pill containers. 
  • You
    can also bring in additional colored clothespins to represent diphthongs (vowel
    combinations) as well as digraphs.
  • You
    can use large clothespins too.  If
    you can’t find colored ones, the easiest thing to do would be to make your own.  I have a number of suggestions linked under the next heading.
  • You can also use clothespins with whole numbers and integers to help students understand the sequence of the number line and when adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing.  
  • You can even use clothespins for grammar.  Students can sort nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs etc. onto the correct clothing hanger.  
Other clothespin ideas found
on Pinterest:
  • Other Clothespin Ideas:

        http://www.pinterest.com/pin/156500155774780549/ 

  • Dying
    Clothespins:

        http://www.pinterest.com/pin/283304632782361405/

  • Painting Clothespins:
I will be getting bigger clothespins too as
they are better at accommodating more than one letter.  This way I can also create activities
for prefixes, roots and suffixes.
If you have any comments or some other cool
ideas to do with clothespins, please share them below.

If you are looking for other ways to make your Orton-Gillinghman or phonics based program fun and enjoyable, you can review all my reading remediation materials at DyslexiaMaterials.com

Cheers, Erica


Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to www.goodsensorylearning.com
www.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz  
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