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Go Dyslexia Episode 8: Dyslexia: Building Vocabulary & Semantic Skills with Infercabulary

. Erica Warren’s 12th Go Dyslexia video podcast: Dyslexia: Building Vocabulary and Semantic Skills with Infercabulary, featuring Guest Beth Lawrence and Host Dr. Erica Warren.

https://youtu.be/WVZkHFXPKo8

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Go Dyslexia Episode 7: Rapid Automatic Naming and Multisensory Methods with Guest Dr. Michael Hart and Host Dr. Erica Warren

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I’m so pleased to announce my seventh Go Dyslexia video podcast: Rapid Automatic Naming and Multisensory Methods with Guest Dr. Michael Hart and Host Dr. Erica Warren. URL:  https://youtu.be/PfwxcU2B3-U

This video podcast shares my most recent video podcast, featuring dyslexia expert and advocate, Dr. Michael Hart. This is the seventh of many, free video podcasts for Go Dyslexia!   

Dr. Michael Hart is a child psychologist and dyslexia expert who offers 25 years of experience in parent and teacher training, educational technology, learning differences, and diagnostic assessments. He is the founder/owner of www.doctormichaelhart.com and is currently providing online webinars and courses that focus on dyslexia.  

During the video podcast, Michael and I talk about rapid automatic naming (RAN) and its impact on dyslexia and more specifically reading.  In addition, we discuss the importance of using the Orton-Gillingham approach, multisensory methods and paying attention to the individual needs of learners.  

URL to Video Podcast: https://youtu.be/PfwxcU2B3-U

What is Rapid Automatic Naming?

Rapid Automatic Naming or Rapid Automatized Naming (RAN) is the ability to quickly verbalize a series of familiar items including letters, numbers, colors or things.  This a cognitive skill that has a major impact for many struggling readers.

Important Links Mentioned in this Video Podcast:

Let us know what you think!! Please help us spread the word by liking, commenting and sharing the video as well as this blog.

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Dr. Erica Warren
Learning Specialist, Educational Therapist, Author, Podcaster, Vlogger and Course Creator.

Go Dyslexia Episode 6: Dyslexia and Memory with Dr. Aaron Ralby

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This video podcast, Dyslexia and Memory features memory and language expert, Aaron Ralby from Linguisticator and host Dr. Erica Warren. This is the sixth of many free video podcasts for Go Dyslexia! This video podcast offers a fascinating discussion about mindful and multisensory strategies that enhance cognition and learning. Come learn about fun and memorable memory palaces and a new virtual reality program that can help individuals with dyslexia.

URL to Video Podcast: https://youtu.be/KS-KJsyH_Bk

What is Linguisticator?
Linguisticator is an online course platform that offers memory and language training. These courses provide systematic, step-by-step guidance on how to use spatial memory techniques to learn large and complex subjects with incredible speed and full retention. Through extensive research into languages, memory, and learning methodologies, Linguisticator distills and maps out subjects while providing solutions for a range of individuals, from children with dyslexia to high school students preparing for final exams and even adults looking for professional language training.

Resources mentioned in the video podcast:
Linguisticator

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Dr. Erica Warren – Your Podcast Host:
YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/warrenerica1
Dyslexia video podcast, video blogs, & resources: https://www.GoDyslexia.com

Voice Dream Writer: A Video Podcast with Author Winston Chen

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This is Dr. Erica Warren’s most recent video podcast, featuring dyslexia advocate and author, Winston Chen. https://youtu.be/uyPcMZyEZ1E

Winston tells us all about the many benefits of his app Voice Dream Writer for individuals with dyslexia. This is the fifth of many free video podcasts for Go Dyslexia!

What is Voice Dream Writer?
Voice Dream Writer is an iOS app that can be used on an iPad or iPhone. It is a easy to use writing application that has a number of powerful features.

Voice Dream Reader Offers a Number of Helpful Tools:

  • Dictation or Voice to Text: Voice Dream Writer offers voice to text or dictation, so you can speak to your iPad and the words will appear.
  • Proof Reading: Now you can edit your writing by listening to the text spoken aloud. Like a personal proofreader, Voice Dream Writer uses text-to-speech technology, so that awkward sentences, grammatical errors and typos can be easily found. It addition, Voice Dream Writer can read words and sentences as they’re typed or dictated so that errors can be corrected right away.
  • Word Finding and Definitions: Voice Dream Writer helps individuals find the right words through phonetic search or meaning search. For example, search for “inuf,”, and you will find “enough”, or search for “large balloon” by meaning and you will find “zeppelin.” Word Finder also shows the dictionary definition of a word.
  • Organizing Ideas: Writer automatically keeps a separate outline of headings, paragraphs and sentences. The Outline helps writers structure their writing and reorganizing paragraphs and sections is a simple drag and drop. In addition, it allows the author to go anywhere in a document without endless scrolling.

Come watch my first video podcast with Winston Chen on his acclaimed app Voice Dream Reader.
URL to Video Podcast: https://youtu.be/OFfzRPFSBrQ
Audio version from iTunes: http://apple.co/1YfhJQE

Resources mentioned in the video podcast:

  • Voice Dream Reader: http://www.voicedream.com/
  • Voice Dream Writer: http://www.voicedream.com/writer/

**Click Below to SUBSCRIBE for More Videos:
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Dr. Erica Warren – Your Podcast Host:
YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/warrenerica1

Let us know what you think!! Please help us spread the word by liking, commenting and sharing the video as well as this blog.

Pros and Cons of Every Student Succeeds Act for Dyslexia

On Friday, December 10th, 2015 Barack Obama Signed the Every Students Succeeds Act. This new law now rewrites the No Child Left Behind Act and offers a number of changes that could have both positive and negative ramifications for students with dyslexia and other learning disabilities.  As with any new law, the true pros and cons will be revealed over time, but here is a list of considerations.
Pros of ESSA
Cons of ESSA
The Common Core curriculum can be adopted by states, but it is no longer required.
Annually, 3rd through 8th grade students will still have to be tested in Math and English.  In addition, high school students will be tested once.
School accountability has shifted from the federal to the state level.  Now, states will be responsible for setting academic goals and evaluating their schools.
Now advocates will have to focus their attention on both federal and state mandates.
There is more flexibility in how accountability tests are administered as well as the testing format.
Only 1% of students (10% or students with disabilities) will qualify for alternate testing. With this cap, the testing needs of many students with dyslexia and other learning disabilities will likely be ignored.
Federal proficiency goals for schools and the penalties for the failure to reach them have been eliminated.
If alternative testing is granted, these students will likely receive “special diplomas” or no diplomas upon graduation.
The creation of a Comprehensive Literacy Center will focus on reading difficulties for kids with disabilities like dyslexia.  The center will offer information for parents and teachers as well as professional development in the areas of screening and educational tools.
If students with learning disabilities don’t receive the needed testing accommodations this could limit their accessibility to higher education.
ESSA will provide up to $160 million in grants on reading skills such as decoding and phonological awareness.
There are no opt-out options proposed in the law.  Each state will be deciding this matter.
States are now required to create a plan that reduces bullying, restraints, seclusions, suspensions and expulsions. This should be helpful as this often
impacts students with dyslexia and other learning disabilities.
The true test of this law lies in the specifics that will soon be defined by each state. Clearly, it will be important for advocates to speak with state representatives and be involved with the creative process so that the needs of students with dyslexia and other learning disabilities are addressed and supported.
Here is an image of the table that can be pinned.


Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to www.goodsensorylearning.comwww.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz  
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Number 1 Trick to Improving a Student’s Writing

There are many effective strategies worth instructing that can improve a student’s writing, but my number one, favorite strategy is teaching the effective use of a thesaurus.

What is a Thesaurus? 
A thesaurus is a book or online site that lists words in groups of synonyms or related concepts.

What are the Benefits of Teaching Students to Use a Thesaurus?
Teaching your students or children to use a thesaurus offers many gains and can be used to:

  1. Expand vocabulary – Using a thesaurus helps students increase their usable word choices.
  2. Avoid repetition – Consulting a thesaurus guides students to alternate word choices when they are concerned with the overuse of a single word within their composition. 
  3. Improve writing quality and sophistication – Utilizing a thesaurus assists students to select more appropriate or mature wording.
  4. Select descriptive words – Consulting a thesaurus helps students find more descriptive words that will enable their audience to better visualize their content.
  5. Impress your readers – Utilizing a thesaurus assists students in finding words that can impress their audience.
  6. Nurture a mindful approach – Using a thesaurus feeds an active, thoughtful and analytical approach to writing.
  7. Find words that are difficult to spell – Consulting a thesaurus assists in finding challenging words to spell when you enter a common synonym to the desired word.
  8. Make the writing process fun – Employing the use of a thesaurus is enjoyable.  I have always enjoyed using a thesaurus and find that it has nurtured a personal love for words.

Are There any Problems with Using a Thesaurus?
When used in a passive or rushed manner, students might select words that don’t make sense in a composition or they may overuse the thesaurus and make documents sound awkward and complex.

What are Some Activities I can Use to Help Students Learn How to Use a Thesaurus?

  1. Provide a passage with a lot of word repetitions.  Ask your students to change the repeated words in the passage by using a thesaurus.  Once the students have rewritten the passage, ask the students to read them aloud and discuss the benefits of using a thesaurus.
  2. Highlight boring, simple words in a passage that are difficult to visualize.  With the use of a thesaurus, ask students to rewrite the passage with synonyms that conjure more visuals in the reader’s mind’s eye.
  3. Give your students a list of simple words and ask them to find other words in a thesaurus that are more descriptive.
  4. Ask students to find words in a thesaurus such as the word, “Kind” and ask them to make a list of all the words that they didn’t know that have the same or similar meaning.  They might come up with words such as philanthropic, benevolent, or one that I just learned by looking at the thesaurus – eleemosynary.
  5. Discuss how mindlessly selecting synonyms can get a writer in trouble because many words have multiple meanings. Then provide a game where your students have to take a mixed up list of words.  Ask them to place these words in order based on similar meaning.  For example, Sad = Down = Under = Lesser = Minor = Young = New.  Once the students are finished with the activity ask them to create their own.

I hope you got some good ideas!  If you have any more activities ideas, please share them below this blog.

Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to www.goodsensorylearning.comwww.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz  
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Key Reason Dyslexics and Struggling Readers Hate to Read

Imagine going to the movies with your eyes closed.  How much of the movie would you understand?  How much of the storyline would you recall?  Not much, and it probably wouldn’t be very engaging. In fact, you may begin to focus on the smells and the sounds of people crunching on popcorn. Your thoughts might wander, and you could even fall asleep. 

Many struggling readers have a similar experience when they open a book. They get little to no visuals in their mind’s eye while reading, they report that it is difficult to maintain attention and many complain that the process is boring.  Others purport to have a “blind mind’s eye” and are amazed to learn that it is possible to create mental imagery while decoding text.    

Why Does This Happen?
The average reader puts 20% of their cognitive effort into decoding and 80% into the visualization and comprehension of the text.  However, most struggling readers put 80% of their cognitive effort into the decoding process, leaving a measly 20% for comprehension. It’s no wonder why many can’t generate personal visualizations and they end up putting books down out of boredom, frustration and exhaustion.


What Makes Reading Fun, Engaging and Memorable are the Visualizations Created from the Text
Voracious readers report that what makes reading enjoyable, enticing and memorable is the mental imagery that they encounter when reading.  They report that they get lost in a “movie in their head.”  In other words, their mind’s eye conjures up visualizations of the words they read and paints pictures. This is similar to watching a movie and their attention and motivation gets pulled into the pages.

What Can We Do to Help Struggling Readers Learn to Create Mental Imagery?
I have found that the best way to teach visualization is through games and mindful discussions. You want to develop this skill to automaticity so that students can generate visualizations while doing other activities such as reading and writing. Here are some activities you can try:

  1. Play imaginary games and encourage your students to generate visualizations and describe them in detail.
  2. Break your classroom into groups of three students.  Ask them to all read a short descriptive passage to themselves.  Then ask them to read it again and highlight the words that create mental imagery.  Next, encourage the students to share their personal visualizations with their partners.  Finally, have the groups report back to the whole class and make a list of all the unique personal visualizations.
  3. Encourage learners to listen to passages of text and then draw images.
  4. After your students read a chapter, ask them to create storyboards – a sequence of drawings that share the storyline.
  5. Take the decoding process away and offer text to speech software.  Encourage your students to close their eyes while listening and create a movie in their head.  When they are finished, have them write about or draw their own personal visualizations.

Are There any Added Benefits of Visualization for Students?
By helping your students learn how to visualize, you can provide them a “secret weapon” that can enhance their learning capacity, improve memory and spark creativity.  In fact, the research shows that visualization not only improves reading comprehension, but also creative writing abilities and memory for math, history and science concepts.  To learn more about this, CLICK HERE.

Is it Ever too Late to Develop One’s Mind’s Eye?
No, it’s never too late. Let me share a story about and elderly woman that began to visualize while reading for the first time in her life:

I’ll never forget a grandmother bringing her grandson to a consultation.  After learning that her grandson had a great visual memory, I asked him if he visualized when reading.  When he said he didn’t, I went into a short explanation and summary of the process I would teach him.  A week later, his grandmother sent me an email.  She expressed that she had been listening to our conversation and that she picked up a book and made a conscious effort to visualize the text for the first time in her life.  She reported that the experience was wonderful. 


Are There any Ready-Made Products that Can Help Students Learn to Develop their Mind’s Eye?
To help teach students to improve their visualization capacity, I wrote a book entitled Mindful Visualization for Education. This 132-page downloadable document (PDF) provides a review of the research, assessment tools, over twenty game-like activities, lesson suggestions in all the subject areas and more.  In addition, I offer two PowerPoint downloads that review the 10 core skills that need to be developed to optimize visualization abilities.

If you have any thoughts or comments, please post them below.


Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to www.goodsensorylearning.comwww.dyslexiamaterials.com, & www.learningtolearn.biz

Dyslexia: Understanding and Remediating Auditory Processing Skills

Although there are a number of cognitive processing deficits that can cause a diagnosis of dyslexia or a reading disability, challenges with auditory processing tend to be the prevailing cause for many struggling readers.  However, many of the terms used to describe these core problems can be confusing.  In fact, wading through a comprehensive testing report can be overwhelming, because they are packed with complex cognitive and remedial terminology.  In this blog, I hope to unscramble the tangle of terms associated with auditory processing.
What are Some Key Terms One Should Understand?
  1. Auditory Processing:  Auditory processing is the brain’s interpretation of the sounds we hear. A difficulty or delay with auditory processing is not an issue with hearing, but with the understanding of what is heard.  It’s a complex operation that involves auditory synthesis, auditory closure, auditory sequencing, auditory discrimination, segmenting and auditory memory.  
  2. Auditory Synthesis or Auditory Blending: The ability to pull together individual sounds to form words.
  3. Auditory Closure: The ability to fill in any missing sounds to decode a word.  For example, this may involve understanding what someone with a foreign accent maybe saying when they delete a sound or two in a word.
  4. Auditory Sequencing: The ability to properly order language sounds in words or sentences.  For example, a child may reverse the units of sound so that when they say the word animal it comes out “aminal.”
  5. Auditory Discrimination: The ability to recognize differences between sounds.  For example, some students may struggle hearing the difference between the short “e” and “a” sounds.
  6. Segmenting: The ability to break a word into individual sounds or phonemes.
  7. Auditory Memory: The ability to remember what is heard.
  8. Phonological Processing: The ability
    to detect and discriminate a broad awareness of sounds including rhyming words, alliterations, syllables, blending sounds into words, as well as deleting or substituting sounds.
  9. Phonemes: The tiny units of sound that make up speech – such as the letter sounds.
  10. Phonemic Awareness: The ability to hear, identify, and manipulate individual sounds – also known as phonemes.  This, for example, includes the ability to detect the first sound, middle sound and end sound in a word.
  11. Phonics: A method of teaching reading by pairing sounds with letters or groups of letters.  It is the process of mapping speech into print.
  12. Receptive Language:  The ability to understand the language that we input, including
    both words and gestures. 
How Can These Difficulties be Remediated?
  1. Use an Orton-Gillingham, phonics based reading program that offers activities that strengthen auditory processing.  One of my favorite programs is Nessy Reading and Spelling.  There are many programs available, and our friends at the Dyslexia Reading Well offer a great review of the different programs.
  2. Build core cognitive skills through games and remedial activities.  Here is a great bundle of cognitive exercises at Good Sensory Learning
  3. Integrate fun activities that help students to practice the needed skills.  Check out the Reading Gamesfollowing Directions Activities and other fun reading publications at Good Sensory Learning.
I hope you found this helpful.  I would love to hear your thoughts.

Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to: www.goodsensorylearning.com, www.dyslexiamaterials.com www.learningtolearn.biz  

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Remediating Dyslexia with Orton Gillingham Based Reading Games

Students with dyslexia and other language-based learning disabilities often learn differently and require an alternative approach to learning basic reading.  What’s more, these young learners are working full tilt while sitting in the classroom and by the time they get home and have to complete their homework, they are mentally spent.  As a result, tagging on remedial reading lessons to a cup that is already overflowing can be enough to turn these kids off to learning altogether.

How Do We Help These Students Learn the Core Skills Needed to be Successful Readers?

  1. First, use a remedial program that is backed by time, testimonials and research.  The Orton-Gillingham approach to reading is a well-established and researched approach that offers a multisensory, sequential, incremental, cumulative, individualized, and explicit approach.  There are many programs that are available.  Click here to learn about a selection of these programs. 
  2. Second, employ an individualized approach as each student has unique challenges and gaps in knowledge.  If you need to assess the areas that require remediation be sure to use an assessment tool such as the Good Sensory Learning Reading Assessment
  3. Third, the process needs to be fun and engaging.  Many programs required students to slog through boring lessons, complicated rules, and bland workbook pages. Many of these concepts can be instructed through cute memory strategies and fun activities.  You can find many fun supplemental materials here
  4. Fourth, integrate a student-created, colorful, language arts handbook or guide. Click here to learn more about this method. 
  5. Fifth, help students learn how to visualize what they are reading.  Many struggling readers do not have the cognitive space to use their mind’s eye when reading, therefore, developing this skill to automaticity is key.  To learn about the research behind visualization and learning as well as how to teach this needed skill click here.  
  6. Sixth, and most important, supplement all reading programs with card and board games that allow students to practice the concepts they are learning.  This brings the fun factor into learning and can help to nurture a love for reading.
Where Can I Find Multisensory and Fun Reading Games?
At Good Sensory Learning, we offer a large selection of downloadable card and board games that work with any Orton-Gillingham or phonics based reading program.  In addition, we have many other supplemental multisensory reading activities and materials.  In fact, we just unveiled a new website. Let me know what you think!

Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to: www.goodsensorylearning.com, www.dyslexiamaterials.com www.learningtolearn.biz  

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Fast Remedial Results for Dyslexics: Creating Mindful Language Arts Handbooks

Do your students have trouble remembering all the phonics, grammar and spelling rules? Do you have to continually review past lessons to assure that struggling readers know the foundational skills? Do you find that one day a student has mastered a concept and the next day you have to start at square one? Having to continually review the same old stuff can be a boring chore for everyone involved. However, one of the most effective methods I have employed with my students is helping them to create their own colorful, language arts handbook.  What’s more, this activity can be fun, engaging, and memorable.
What Format Should be Used?
I find that it is best to be flexible.  Let each student select from doing his or her handbook on a computer or by hand in a photo album, blank book, binder or a notebook. 
What are the Secrets to Making a Student Created Handbook Work?

  1. Make this project exciting and be enthusiastic!
  2. Let each student come up with their own fun name for their handbook and allow them to create their own colorful cover. 
  3. Give clear directions and provide sample pages.  
  4. Allow your students to use a large selection of art and craft supplies such as paints, magazine clippings (to make a collage), stickers, sparkles and more.
  5. Encourage your students to share strategies and ideas.
  6. If needed, break the page into labeled sections so that your students know what they have to include on each page.
  7. Teach students to place a single concept on each new page.
  8. If there are a series of steps required to learn a task, help the students define a color-coded sequence of steps.  Encourage them to use a numbered list, web, or flowchart. 
  9. Integrate both visual and auditory mnemonics, rhymes, raps, and ditties on each page.
  10. Include sample problems or examples on each page. 
  11. If the student is highly kinesthetic, encourage them to come up with a hand clapping routine or dance for the rhymes, ditties and raps.
  12. Tell your students that you will be having contests for the best pages for each new concept. Take these winning pages and scan them for your own, “Best of Language Arts Handbook.” This handbook can be used to motivate and give ideas to future students.  Try to help each student in the class win at least one page in your, “Best of Language Arts Handbook.”
Sample Page:


Here is a pinnable image:

If you would like to do something similar for math, come read my blog entitled Mathemagic: Multisensory and Mindful Math Strategies Tailored for the Individual 

Here is a pinnable image:  

I would love to hear your thoughts.  Please share them below this blog post.

Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials. She is also the director of Learning to Learn, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to: www.goodsensorylearning.com, www.dyslexiamaterials.com www.learningtolearn.biz  


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Podcast

Go Dyslexia Episode 8: Dyslexia: Building Vocabulary & Semantic Skills with Infercabulary

This is Dr. Erica Warren’s 12th Go Dyslexia video podcast: Dyslexia: Building Vocabulary and Semantic Skills with Infercabulary, featuring Guest Beth Lawrence and Host Dr. Erica Warren.

https://youtu.be/WVZkHFXPKo8

This video podcast shares my most recent interview featuring dyslexia expert Beth Lawrence, MA, CCC-SLP. Beth is an Orton Gillingham trained, certified speech-language pathologist, and CEO of Communication Apptitude (dba InferCabulary and WordQuations).

This is the 12th of many free video podcasts for Go Dyslexia!   During the video podcast, Beth and I talk about Infercabulary, a fun and multisensory online site that offers vocabulary and semantic reasoning development exercises and assessments. Beth talks about the importance of developing language skills and also provides a quick description of her app, WordQuations and assessment, Test of Semantic Reasoning.

What is Infercabulary? Infercabulary is a fun online site that develops the language skills semantic reasoning and vocabulary.  Instead of asking students to memorize complex language-definitions, students can now learn to use semantic reasoning skills to actively infer the meaning of words based on seeing five images of the word used in different contexts.  The activities use visual and audio cues to present lessons and game-like assessments that make the process both fun and memorable.  I have now implemented this software into my own private practice for session activities as well as home-fun assignments (I don’t give homework, I give optional home-fun suggestions). The best parts is I can track my student’s progress and growth. This is a dynamic tool that can be used by parents, teachers, learning specialists, reading specialist, educational therapists and more.

Get 30% off Infercabulary: If you would like to purchase Infercabulary, they are offering a special promotion for my audience.  Simply use coupon code GoDyslexia at checkout to receive 30% off!

Important Links Mentioned in this Podcast:

URL to Video Podcast: https://youtu.be/WVZkHFXPKo8

This is Dr. Erica Warren’s 12th Go Dyslexia video podcast: Dyslexia: Building Vocabulary and Semantic Skills with Infercabulary, featuring Guest Beth Lawrence and Host Dr. Erica Warren.

https://youtu.be/WVZkHFXPKo8

This video podcast shares my most recent interview featuring dyslexia expert Beth Lawrence, MA, CCC-SLP. Beth is an Orton Gillingham trained, certified speech-language pathologist, and CEO of Communication Apptitude (dba InferCabulary and WordQuations).

This is the 12th of many free video podcasts for Go Dyslexia!   During the video podcast, Beth and I talk about Infercabulary, a fun and multisensory online site that offers vocabulary and semantic reasoning development exercises and assessments. Beth talks about the importance of developing language skills and also provides a quick description of her app, WordQuations and assessment, Test of Semantic Reasoning.

What is Infercabulary? Infercabulary is a fun online site that develops the language skills semantic reasoning and vocabulary.  Instead of asking students to memorize complex language-definitions, students can now learn to use semantic reasoning skills to actively infer the meaning of words based on seeing five images of the word used in different contexts.  The activities use visual and audio cues to present lessons and game-like assessments that make the process both fun and memorable.  I have now implemented this software into my own private practice for session activities as well as home-fun assignments (I don’t give homework, I give optional home-fun suggestions). The best parts is I can track my student’s progress and growth. This is a dynamic tool that can be used by parents, teachers, learning specialists, reading specialist, educational therapists and more.

Get 30% off Infercabulary: If you would like to purchase Infercabulary, they are offering a special promotion for my audience.  Simply use coupon code GoDyslexia at checkout to receive 30% off!

Important Links Mentioned in this Podcast:

URL to Video Podcast: https://youtu.be/WVZkHFXPKo8

Audio version from iTunes:

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