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Holiday Activities that Strengthen Following Directions Skills and Freebie Offering

Do some of your students struggle with subtle linguistic cues, tricky wording and following both oral and written directions?  Difficulties in these areas can make it challenging to complete all aspects of an assignment, interpret multistep directions and comprehend multiple choice tests.  This is a common problem for students with dyslexia and other language based learning disabilities, however most students benefit from the development of this skill.  So what can we do to help foster these skills while bringing in the fun factor?

With the holiday season around the corner, many students love to get into the spirit and providing festive activities can be entertaining and motivating.  My Thanksgiving and Christmas Following Directions Activities could be just what you are looking for! In fact, I offer a holiday bundle too that celebrates, Halloween, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Easter, St Patrick’s Day and Valentines Day.  Come download some free sample following directions activities.

If you would like to enter a contest to win a free copy of my Holiday Bundle, come on over to my facebook page between now and December 15.

Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to www.goodsensorylearning.comwww.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz  

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Mastering Tricky Wording: Free Follow Directions Summer Fun Activities

 Following Directions Activities

It’s easy to forget how challenging it can be for children to learn the complexities of the English language.  Following a parents’ directives, interpreting the needed steps to complete a homework assignment, understanding multiple choice test questions, and discerning a teacher’s instructions are just a few examples of how young learners need to be able to understand and navigate the subtleties of linguistic cues.  For many children, learning to follow directions is a complex task that requires instruction, and the mastery of this skill involves vocabulary development, mental flexibility, attention to details, listening skills, receptive language skills, and verbal reasoning.

What Happens When Kids Have Trouble Following Directions?
When kids have trouble following directions, they often encounter the annoyance and frustration of others.  In fact, a true misunderstanding can even result in ridicule and punishments that can leave the child confused and dejected.

How Can We Teach This Needed Skill in a Positive Way?
The two most important things to do is to be patient and to make the process fun and engaging.   Playing games like “Simon Says,” or creating a scavenger hunt can help to teach this needed skill, but finding the time to do this can be difficult.  However, if you would like to develop this skill through printable, game-like handouts or workbooks, I am offering free samples of my Following Directions: The Fun and Easy Way publications.  Just click here to learn more.

I hope you found this post, ideas and materials helpful.  If you have any thoughts or further ideas, please share them below this post.
Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to www.goodsensorylearning.com, www.dyslexiamaterials.com, www.learningtolearn.biz  

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Using a Geoboard to Help Students with Dysgraphia


Recently I discovered the geoboard and now I love to use this product to develop mathematical skills, visual spatial skills, visual reasoning and fine motor dexterity.  In fact it is great for my students that have dysgraphia.

What is a Geoboard?
A geoboard is a math manipulative that students can use to explore basic shapes and geometry such as perimeter, area and coordinate graphing.  It consists of a wood board with evenly spaced rows of nails or a plastic board with protruding pegs around which string or rubber bands are wrapped.

How Do I Use My Geoboards?
Due to the popularity of rubber band bracelets, one can get a huge variety of colorful rubber bands in many different sizes.  I have organized mine into sectioned plastic boxes so that my students have many options to choose from.  Here are a number of fun activities that I offer my students in my own private practice.

For my young learners I use the geoboard to:

  1. learn the formation of letters and numbers.  It is a wonderful tool to use when students struggle with letter, number or symbol reversals.
  2. instruct about the many shapes – triangles, squares, rectangles…
  3. develop spatial skills where students copy a design I create on another geoboard or from a picture of a design that I created on a geoboard.
For my older students I use the geoboard to:
  1. develop writing skills.   Players create images that they then described in writing so that another player can create the image by following the directions.
  2. teach and review coordinate graphing.
  3. teach and review the plotting of points on a coordinate plane.
  4. creating, line, frequency and bar graphs.

If you too are using a geoboard, I would love for you to comment below this blog.  Also please share if you are using the geoboard in other creative ways.

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