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Executive Functioning Game: In or Out

I’m so pleased to announce the release of my new Publication: Executive Functioning Game: In or Out!  It is the first of a series of executive functioning games that I have been creating over the past six months.
Card Descriptions: 
All 30 cards include two images: an inner image and an outer image. There are six images: a car, a light bulb, an alien, a raindrop, a flower and a hand. In addition, there are five different colors: yellow, red, blue, green and purple. It is a complex matching game that requires players to remember and utilize rules to search for commonalities amongst cards. The black symbol in the middle of the inner image directs players to look at the inner image or the outer image. Then players compare cards from their deck to the image in the discard pile. The black cat is simply a distractor and has no other purpose in the game.

What Population of Learners Does This Serve?


In or Out is a fabulously fun game for anyone, but it also serves as a cognitive, remedial tool that strengthens executive functioning skills: working memory, attention to detail, management of distractions, stamina, response inhibition, as well as mental shifting and sustained attention. For remedial purposes, this game can benefit individuals with ADHD, learning disabilities, executive functioning disorder as well as those with head injuries and the elderly.

For 1 to 3 Players:
Initially, I play the game with my students and verbalize the process. I slowly scaffold the process over to them. Once they have it, we play against one another.

Where Can I Purchase the Game?
The game is presently available @ Good Sensory Learning as a digital download. I am looking into printing decks of cards, and they will eventually be available on Amazon.


Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to www.goodsensorylearning.comwww.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz  
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Show Don’t Tell 2: A New Descriptive, Suspense Writing Game

Have you ever read a book that you couldn’t put down, because the author’s words allowed you to visualize the scenes as if you had a movie going on in your head? These authors are masters of descriptive writing and have learned to paint pictures in their audiences’ minds eye through the use of descriptive and figurative language.

How Can Descriptive Writing Be Taught to Students?
Many teachers instruct their students to “show” their readers the scenes through rich descriptions, instead of just telling the audience what happens. In fact, a common critique that students might hear is, “Show me; don’t tell me!”

Bringing Games Into the Learning Process:
If you follow me or have purchased any of my products, you probably already know that bringing enjoyment and games into lessons is one of my primary goals.

Due to the popularity of Show Don’t Tell Descriptive Writing Game, which many teachers play in classrooms and homeschoolers use to bring joy into teaching descriptive writing, I have now released a new version that teaches students the fundamentals of descriptive, suspense writing.  My new game, Show Don’t Tell 2, is a multisensory, downloadable and printable game. The purpose of the game is to help young writers learn how to and practice the skill of “showing” readers with the use of descriptive words and figurative language.   This new game also integrates additional types of figurative language, as well as practice with leading words, sensory hints, suspense words, setting the scene and building tension.  Instead of “telling a story” players quickly learn how to vividly describe a dramatic scene or scenario while having fun!

If you would like to learn more or purchase this game, Click Here.

Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go www.goodsensorylearning.com, www.dyslexiamaterials.com www.learningtolearn.biz  

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Eight, Dyslexia Games Make All Reading Programs Fun and Memorable

Do you ever have to bribe your students with candy or stickers to entice them to read through long lists of words or complete workbook activities?  There are a multitude of phonics and Orton-Gillingham based reading programs available on the market, but so many of them place struggling readers through boring drills and activities.  I experienced the same problem.  What could I do?

I Created Games to Bring the Fun Factor into My Lessons:
Over the past few years, I created a system to make any reading program fun and motivating.  I designed and published board and card games to weave into reading lessons.  Now, my students can’t wait for their sessions, are reading more, have increased stamina and they are mastering concepts at a faster pace.  A series of three reading game publication bundles have been available and selling like hot cakes, but upon popular request, I have released a new title, Reading Games Primary.  This publication offers new games that help students master basic reading concepts such as syllables, rhyming words, short vowel sounds, ending sound blends and sight words by playing super fun and engaging card and board games.  

Tell Me More About the 8 Games:

  1. Sight Word War:  

    Sight Word War is a card game
    that helps students master sight words and practice basic alphabetizing
    skills.  

  2. Syllable Sort:  Syllable Sort is a card game that helps students master syllable divisions in words.
  3. Switch-A-Roo Reading: Switch-A-Roo Reading is a reading/writing game that helps students learn beginning, middle and ending word sounds
    as well as rhyming words. 
  4. Sole Survivor:  Sole Survivor is a board game that helps
    students master breaking words into syllables as well as beginning and ending word
    sounds.
  5. Animal Party:  Animal Party is a board game that helps students learn beginning, middle and end sounds of simple three letter words.
  6. Animal Bingo:  Animal Bingo is a board game that helps
    students master breaking words into syllables as well as beginning and ending word
    sounds.  It also develops tracking and
    counting skills.
  7. Three of A Kind Beginners:  Three of a Kind is a card game that
    helps students learn rhyming words, beginning sounds, middle sounds and ending
    sounds of simple three letter words. 
  8. Three of A Kind Intermediate:  Three of a Kind Intermediate is a card game
    that helps students master rhyming words, beginning blends, middle sounds and
    ending sounds of simple four to five letter words.  
Are There Other Reading Games?
Yes.  Reading Games Primary is my fourth bundle of reading games to be published.  In fact, I have created more than 50 different games for all levels of reading remediation.  To learn more about all of these games and even download a free sample game,  click here.


Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to www.goodsensorylearning.comwww.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz  

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10 Great Games for Students with Dyslexia

With the holiday season almost upon us, finding fun and beneficial educational materials can be key for keeping students with dyslexia busy over the break.  What’s more, you can continue to use these activities throughout the year to help remediate areas of difficulty. Games can be one of the best ways to help these kids, especially because struggling learners won’t even know that their brains are hard at work!

Holiday Gift:
One of my favorite games, Puppy Party, helps students to master the short vowels sounds and is great for any Orton-Gillingham or phonics based reading program.   CLICK HERE to get your free downloadable copy!

Ten Great Games to Buy for Kids with Dyslexia:

  1. Hey What’s the Big Idea: This is a fun, family game that teaches children how to generate and discriminate between main ideas and details.
  2. Word Shuffle: Word Shuffle is a fabulous word game that strengthens processing speed and language skills.  With three levels – elementary, middle school and high school, students will master concepts like rhyming words, grammar, parts of speech, figurative language and literary terms. 
  3. 5 Ws Detective:  This delightful sentence game develops language skills, sequencing, word retrieval and helps beginning writers solve silly cases by answering who did it, what they did, when it was done, and why it happened.  Players work against the clock to fill in the data and summarize their findings.     
  4. Reading Games:  Great for any Orton-Gillingham or Phonics based reading program, Reading Games offers 11 games, 17 printable decks and two printable board games that work on the different types of syllables, syllabication, affixes and compound words.
  5. Reading Games 2: Like Reading Games, these games work seamlessly with any Orton-Gillingham or Phonics based reading program.  These games focus on blending and spelling.  
  6. Reading Board Games:  Orton-Gillingham or Phonics friendly, Reading Board Games offers 7 reproducible board games that cover the 6 syllable types as well as syllabication. 
  7. Piggy Banking: This engaging board game helps players learn how to use a debit card, bank register and to write checks.  They will also learn about bank loans, bounced checks, discounts, tips, rebased, interest and more.  
  8. Place Value Panic: With 4 games ranging in difficulty level, Place Value Panic is loads of fun. The simplest game works on the ones, tens, hundreds and thousands place, whereas the most difficult level uses 13 place values. 
  9. Show Don’t Tell:   Show Don’t Tell is a fun, multisensory writing game that helps players to “show readers” with descriptive verbs, adjectives, adverbs, similes, metaphors and personification.  Instead of telling stories, learners will quickly master descriptive writing.
  10. Grammar Games Galore: Grammar Games Galore offers 5 new and engaging card games that help players master the parts of speech.   
I wish you and your family a wonderful, fun-filled holiday season.


Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to www.goodsensorylearning.comwww.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz  

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OSMO Develops Verbal Reasoning, Sequential, Spatial, and Critical Thinking Skills

Being a personal trainer for the brain, I am always looking for multisensory tools that can develop the different cognitive processing areas.  A few months back, a saw a video promotion for OSMO and I was hooked.  I preordered OSMO and recently received my materials.  I’m happy to say that it has exceeded my expectations!


What Exactly is OSMO?
OSMO is a wonderful tool that brings iPad activities into the real world.  This new technology utilizes the space in front of the iPad to take games off the screen.  The use of a base and a reflective camera, allows players to interact with three game-like apps.  Drawings and physical objects are captured by the device and transported back onto the screen.  The product also provides actual tangram shapes as well as letter tiles that can be used in the activities.  Once the apps are downloaded, there is no need for the internet to play the activities.

What Do I Get When I Purchase OSMO?
OSMO comes with three, neat and well-designed boxes that magnetically snap together.  One box holds the base and reflective device that slips onto the iPad.  The other two boxes hold manipulatives for two of the games. Otherwise, directions guide the buyer on how to set up your own iPad by going to a web address and then downloading three free apps. The set up was quick and simple. 


Tell Me More About the Three Activities?
There are three games offered by the company:  Newton, Tangrams, and Words:

  • Newton: This game develops spatial reasoning skills, visual-spatial abilities, and executive functioning.  The object of this game is to divert a falling ball to one or more targets. Players can do this by first placing a piece of paper or a dry erase board in front of the OSMO and either drawing or placing objects onto this surface.  These drawing or objects then appear on the iPad screen, diverting the ball to the target. 

  • Tangram: This game develops visual spatial abilities, nonverbal reasoning, fine motor skills, and executive functioning. Wooden puzzle pieces can be arranged in the playing field, challenging players to match images projected on the iPad.  The game guides players through the process and slowly reveals a map of more difficult puzzles.

  • Words: This game develops verbal reasoning skills, sequential processing and decoding abilities.  Images are projected on the iPad to serve as word clues.  Players can then place letter tiles in the playing field to guess the possible word. Players can play individually or they can compete against another player. The game gets progressively more difficult as play continues. Best of all you can upload your own words and images to make this game applicable to current academics.  What a wonderful way to practice spelling or vocabulary words!

What About the Future of OSMO?

  • The designers claim that they have plans to create more interactive games if the company grows.  I can’t wait to see what they come up with next!
  • OSMO has even caught the eye of Apple.  Apple will be featuring it on their website.  
  • I contacted the company to ask whether I could create separate student profiles.  It is not possible at present, but they said that they are already working on this feature and hope to release it soon. 
Where Can I View a Video of OSMO? 



How Can I Purchase  OSMO?

Click Here or on the following link:

I would love to hear your thoughts about OSMO and learn about your experiences with this new, awesome device.

Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to www.goodsensorylearning.comwww.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz  
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Ten, Fun Games that Strengthen Visual Processing

Visual processing is an important cognitive skill for children to develop, and there are many fun games that help to strengthen this skill.  

What is Visual Processing and Why is it Important?
Visual processing is a visual cognitive skill that allows us to process and interpret meaning from the visual information that we see through our eyes, and it plays an important role in reading, math, and spelling.  

What Are the Cognitive Skills that Make up Visual Processing
Visual processing involves a number of cognitive components:

  1. Visual Processing Speed: the ability to process visual
    information at a rapid pace.
  2. Visual
    Scanning: 
    the ability to look at and absorb all parts of visual information
    and text.
  3. Visual Spatial
    Skills:
    the ability to mentally manipulate
    2-dimensional and 3-dimensional figures.
  4. Visual Spatial Reasoning: the ability
    to perceive the spatial relationships between objects.
  5. Visual Construction Skills: the ability to organize and
    manually manipulate spatial information to make a design.  
  6. Visual Memory: the ability to remember what is seen.
  7. Visual Motor
    Integration:
    the ability to translate visual perception into motor planning,
    sequencing, control, coordination and speed.
  8. Visual Synthesis: the ability to unite visual information into a coherent whole. 
  9. Visual Sequencing: the ability to determine or remember the order of symbols, words, or objects.
  10. Visual Closure: the ability to make sense of visual information when some of the image is missing.
  11. Visual Reasoning: the ability to find meaning and make sense out of visual information.
What Are Some Games that Can Help to Develop These Skills?
  1. Set: Set is a card game of recognition and deduction. Each card contains one of three symbols (squiggles, diamonds, ovals) in varying numbers (up to three), colors (purple, green, red), and degrees of shading. A player arranges 12 cards, face up, and all the players quickly discriminate “sets” of three cards linked by combinations of sameness or difference. This game works on visual discrimination, processing speed, reasoning, sequencing, and visual scanning.
  2. Tricky Fingers: Who can match the pattern card first?  Non-removable marbles are manipulated.  This game works on visual processing speed, motor integration, sequencing, construction skills, spatial skills, and synthesis.
  3. Spot it: Spot it is played with 55 cards, each decorated with eight symbols varying in size and orientation. The object of the game is to be the first to spot the one symbol in common between two or more cards. This game works on visual processing speed, scanning, motor integration, discrimination and memory.
  4. Logic Links: Each puzzle is comprised of a series of clues that instruct the player where to place colored chips to solve a puzzle. This game works on visual reasoning, sequencing, and visual scanning.
  5. Blokus: The goal of this game is for players to fit all of their pieces onto the board. The player who gets rid of all of their tiles first is the winner. This game works on visual motor integration, reasoning, sequencing, construction skills, spatial skills, and synthesis.
  6. Pixy Cubes: Pixy Cubes uses challenge cards for players to match or they can design colorful pictures with 16 colorful cubes.  This game works on visual motor integration, memory, processing speed, spatial reasoning, sequencing, construction skills, spatial skills, and synthesis.
  7. Q-Bits: Q-bitz will challenge your visual agility. Players puzzle over how to quickly recreate the patterns on the game cards using their set of 16 cubes. This game works on visual motor integration, processing speed, spatial reasoning, sequencing, construction skills, spatial skills, and synthesis.
  8. Q-Bits Extreme: This is the same game as Q-Bits, but the cubes are not all the same and the puzzles are more challenging. This game works on visual motor integration, processing speed, spatial reasoning, sequencing, construction skills, spatial skills, and synthesis.
  9. Blink: Blink is a quick game where two players race to be the first to use all their cards. Players quickly match cards by the shape, count, or color on the cards. The first player out of cards wins.  This works on visual processing speed, discrimination and scanning.





I hope you found this helpful.  If you know of other card or board games that you find benefit visual processing, please share them below.  


Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to www.goodsensorylearning.comwww.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz  
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More Games that Benefit the Brain: A Review

If you have been reading my blogs, you know I’m a big fan of bringing the fun factor into learning.  In fact, did you know there are many games that can improve cognitive functioning?  Kids love to play card and board games, and there are quite a few that exercise and strengthen the brain. Back in September I reviewed 15 games that can benefit cognition and I wanted to add a few more to the list:

Game:
Cognitive Benefits
Where to Purchase
Rat-A-Tat-Cat:
·
Visual Processing
·
Visual Memory
·
Planning
·
Attention
·
Working Memory
Amazon: See link below
Q-Bits – Extreme:
·
Visual Processing
·
Spatial Relations
·
Speed of Processing
·
Attention to Detail
·
Mental Flexibility
·
Executive Functioning
·
Perceptual Reasoning
Amazon: See link below
Duple:
·
Visual Processing
·
Word Finding
·
Processing Speed
·
Hemisphere Integration
·
Attention to Details
Amazon: See link below
Stare:
·
Visual Memory
·
Speed of Processing
·
Metacognitive Skills
·
Attention to Details
Amazon: See link below
Color Code:
·
Visual Processing
·
Nonverbal Reasoning
·
Spatial Relations
·
Planning
·
Perceptual Reasoning
Amazon: See link below
No Speed Limit:
·
Processing Speed
·
Visual Processing
·
Visual Memory
·
Executive Functioning
·
Perceptual Reasoning
Amazon: See link below
Qwitch:
·
Mental Flexibility
·
Sequential Processing
·
Speed of Processing
·
Working Memory
·
Hemisphere Integration
Amazon: See link below
Anomia:
·
Word Finding
·
Processing Speed
·
Hemisphere Integration
·
Attention to Details
Amazon: See link below
Speedabee:
·
Word Finding
·
Speed of Processing
·
Mental Flexibility
·
Listening Skills
·
Auditory Processing
·
Verbal Reasoning
Amazon: See link below

I hope you found this useful.  If you know of other card or board games, that you would like me to review, please share them in the comment box below.  

 


Cheers, Erica

Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to www.goodsensorylearning.comwww.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz  
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Free Vowel Combination Game

Using games to teach students the vowel combinations or vowel teams can be a wonderful way to entice your students and brings the fun factor into your lesson.  
Here is a free game, Voweleos, that I created that is similar to the game Dominoes.  

            For two to five players (for 3-5 players make two or more sets mixed together).
The vowel combinations can be:
  1. Copied onto 3” by 5” index cards that are cut in half horizontally 
  2. Written onto rectangular tiles 
  3. Printed on card stock and cut  
            Directions: Play on a surface with a lot of cleared space or play on the floor.  Shuffle the deck or tiles.  Decide which player begins and play proceeds in a clockwise rotation.  Each player or team should be dealt ten cards or tiles.  You can play open or closed handed.  Beginners should always play with their vowel combinations visible to everyone, so that the teacher or parent can assist them.  Place the rest of the deck/tiles face down and turn one card/tile over and display it in the middle of the playing field (the beginning card).  The first player must select one of their cards/tiles that makes the same sound as one side of the beginning card/tile and then place it aside the beginning card/tile.  Like dominoes, you can only play off the ends.  If a player cannot make a move, they must select from the card deck or remaining tiles until they can.  The winner is the first one to use all of his or her cards. 
Please note that you can color-code the cards/tiles to remind students the number of sounds that each vowel combination can make: red = 1 sound, blue = 2 sounds, green = 3 sounds.  For example, ai is red because it only makes one possible sound, whereas ea is green because it can make three possible sounds.  If you would like to play this game before you have introduced all of the vowel combinations, you can make two decks of the red cards/tiles and play with the vowel combinations that make a single sound. 
Here is a list of all the playing cards/tiles.
To learn about other reading games, consider purchasing one of my Reading Games publications. These digital downloads offer a large selection of reading card games and board games that are wonderful for any phonics or Orton Gillingham reading program.  Finally, look on the page for a blue button for a free sample of one of my board games too. If you like this game, please share it with your friends and leave a comment below. 

Cheers, Erica


Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to www.goodsensorylearning.comwww.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz  
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Games that Benefit the Brain

Most kids love to play card and board games, but did you
know that many offer benefits far beyond the obvious social gains.  Many of these activities are actually good
for cognition and can exercise the brain.

There are
three types of benefits:
1.  Brain Breaks: Some games offer quick “brain
breaks” that can be used during homework completion.  A quick reward, when stamina is low, can energize the brain and regain focus. 
2.  Brain Integration: Other games can help
integrate the brain.  Some students
can lack integration between the two hemispheres of the brain and these
activities activate the whole brain. 
3.  Cognitive Remediation: Finally,
there are games that help to strengthen specific areas of cognition and they
can serve as a form of cognitive therapy. 
By exercising these parts of the brain, new neural pathways can develop
and areas of weakness can be strengthened and even remediated.

Here is a table that reviews some of my favorite games, lists of the cognitive gains and offers links to the products.

GAME: Time to
Play
COGNITIVE
BENEFITS
WHERE TO PURCHASE
Spot it:  about 2-4 minutes

  • Visual
    Processing
  • Processing
    Speed
  • Attention to
    Detail
  • Attention
  • Hemisphere Integration
Amazon:  See link below
Blink:   about 2-4 minutes
  • Visual
    Processing
  • Processing
    Speed
  • Attention to
    Detail
  • Attention
  • Mental
    Flexibility
  • Nonverbal Reasoning
Amazon:  See link below
Set:  about 5-10 minutes
  • Visual
    Processing
  • Speed of
    Processing
  • Attention to
    Detail
  • Attention
  • Mental
    Flexibility
  • Executive
    Functioning
  • Nonverbal
    Reasoning
Amazon:  See link below
Q Bits:  depends on the number of rounds played – 2-30 minutes
  • Visual
    Processing
  • Spatial
    Relations
  • Speed of
    Processing
  • Attention to
    Detail
  • Mental
    Flexibility
  • Executive
    Functioning
  • Nonverbal
    Reasoning
Amazon:  See link below
Master Mind:  depends on the number of rounds played – 10-30 minutes
  • Visual
    Processing
  • Visual
    Reasoning
  • Nonverbal
    Reasoning
  • Attention to
    Detail
  • Attention
  • Mental
    Flexibility
  • Executive
    Functioning
Amazon:  See link below
Doodle Dice: about 15 minutes
  • Visual
    Processing
  • Nonverbal
    Reasoning
  • Attention to
    Detail
  • Spatial
    Relations
  • Attention
  • Mental
    Flexibility
  • Executive
    Functioning
Amazon:  See link below
Blokus: about 30-45 minutes
  • Visual
    Processing
  • Nonverbal
    Reasoning
  • Attention to
    Detail
  • Spatial
    Relations
  • Attention
  • Mental
    Flexibility
  • Executive
    Functioning
Amazon:  See link below
Logic Links: depends on the number of
rounds played – 3-30 minutes
  • Visual
    Processing
  • Nonverbal
    Reasoning
  • Attention to
    Detail
  • Attention
  • Mental
    Flexibility
  • Executive
    Functioning
Amazon:  See link below
Word Around Game:  depends on the number of rounds played – 5-30 minutes
  • Visual
    Processing
  • Verbal
    Reasoning
  • Sequential
    Processing
  • Attention
  • Mental
    Flexibility
  • Executive
    Functioning
Amazon:  See link below
Scattergories the Card Game: depends on the number of rounds played –
5-30 minutes
  • Simultaneous
    Processing
  • Word Finding
  • Speed of
    Processing
  • Attention
  • Mental
    Flexibility
  • Executive
    Functioning
Amazon:  See link below
Scattergories the Board Game: depends on the
number of rounds played – 5-30 minutes
  • Simultaneous
    Processing
  • Word Finding
  • Speed of
    Processing
  • Attention
  • Mental
    Flexibility
  • Executive
    Functioning
Amazon:  See link below
Pictionary: depends on the number of rounds played-
5-60 minutes
  • Nonverbal
    Reasoning
  • Verbal
    Reasoning
  • Fine Motor
    Dexterity
  • Speed of
    Processing

Amazon:  See link below

Apples to Apples: depends on the number of
rounds played- 10-30 minutes
  • Verbal
    Reasoning
  • Attention
  • Mental
    Flexibility

Amazon:  See link below

Cranium: depends on the number of rounds played –
5-30 minutes

  • Auditory Processing
  • Visual Processing
  • Processing Speed
  • Attention to Detail
  • Attention
  • Hemisphere Integration
  • Fine Motor
  • Verbal Reasoning
  • Sequential Processing

Amazon:  See link below

Jenga – depends on the number of rounds played-
5-30 minutes
  • Fine Motor
    Dexterity
  • Motor
    Planning
  • Nonverbal
    Reasoning
Amazon:  See link below




I hope you found this helpful.  If you know of other card or board games that you find beneficial, please share them in the comment box below.  I will then update this blog to reflect your ideas.


Cheers, Erica

Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to www.goodsensorylearning.comwww.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz  
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Fun End of the Year Activities and Games

Fun End of the Year Activities and Games Linky Party

Cheers, Erica