Posts

Using Simple Images to Teach Math Concepts

Utilizing imagery and visual memory can be very
helpful when learning mathematics. 
A single picture can help a student define and remember a concept, or it
can even help them to recall the steps required to compute a problem.  What’s more, it often brings the “fun
factor” into the learning environment as students can pull out their crayons,
colored pencils or magic markers to complete the activity.

I recently learned about the Palm Tree Method from
one of my students. I scoured the internet to find its origin, but came up
empty handed.  So, although I did
not come up with this idea, it is still one of my favorites for solving
proportions.  
If you would like to learn about other imagery activities
to help your students learn math concepts, you might like my blog entitled Mathemagic or my products Measurement Memory Strategies or Why We Should Learn about Angles.

Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go www.goodsensorylearning.com, www.dyslexiamaterials.com www.learningtolearn.biz  

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Dyslexic Advantage Webinar on Multisensory Teaching for Students with Dyslexia

Dear Friends:

I wanted to share a link to a free webinar on Multisensory Teaching. The hosts, Drs. Brock and Fernette Eide, the authors of The Dyslexic Advantage and The Mislabeled Child, are international experts on dyslexia and learning differences and they interviewed me as a guest speaker. This online event took place this August and you can view a youtube version of the webinar at the following link:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nVXwqyxTbPs

Cheers, Erica

Free Webinar on Multisensory Teaching

Dear Friends:

I wanted to send you an invitation to attend a free webinar on Multisensory Teaching, featuring myself as the guest speaker. The hosts, Drs. Brock and Fernette Eide, the co-authors of The Dyslexic Advantage and The Mislabeled Child, are international authorities on dyslexia and learning differences.  They are featuring this online event on August 21st at 5:30 Pacific Standard Time or 8:30 Eastern Standard Time. You can register by clicking on the following link.

http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07e7zd7jgodceef30d&llr=u5ihfjnab

Cheers, Erica

11 End of the Year Activities Using Balls and Balloons

http://learningspecialistmaterials.blogspot.com/

Balls and balloons offer a
cheap and fun way to complete your school year.  What’s more integrating balls and balloons brings a tactile,
playful, and kinesthetic modality into the classroom.  Balls and balloons can be used to review the academic
content, as well as mindfulness activities and keepsakes.  Below is featured a variety of entertaining,
multisensory ideas.

Reviewing Key Topics from
the School Year
These games can be played
with an entire class in a large circle facing one another, or you can break the
students into small groups or pairs. 
1) Parts of Speech Game:  Place the parts
of speech on a balloon or ball.  Have
the students pass the balloon or ball to one another.  Instruct them to say aloud the first part of speech they
see.  Then ask them to provide a
word that is an example of that part of speech.  Players can not repeat a word that has already been used.  If they do, they are out of the game.
2) Figurative Language Game:  Place the figurative language terms on a balloon or ball.  Have the students pass the balloon or
ball to one another, and instruct them to say aloud the first figurative
language term they see.  Then ask
them to provide a phrase that is an example of that type of figurative
language.  Players can not repeat a
figurative language example that has already been used.  If they do, they are out of the game.
3) Types of Syllables Game:
www.learningspecialistmaterials.blogspot.com

Place the syllable types on
a balloon or ball.  Have the
students pass the balloon or ball to one another, and instruct them to say
aloud the first syllable type that they see.  Then ask them to provide a word that is an example of that
type of syllable.  Players can not
repeat a word that has already been used. 
If they do, they are out of the game.

4) Vowel Combinations or Vowel Teams Game:
Place the vowel combinations
on a balloon or ball.  Have the
students pass the balloon or ball to one another, and instruct them to say
aloud the first vowel combination that they see.  Then ask them to provide a word that uses that vowel
combination.  Players can not
repeat an example that has already been used.  If they do, they are out of the game.
5) Types of Sentences:
Place the types of sentences
on a balloon or ball.  Have the
students pass the balloon or ball to one another, and instruct them to say
aloud the first sentence type that they see.  Then ask them to provide a sentence that illustrates that
sentence type.  Players can not
repeat a sentence that has already been used.  If they do, they are out of the game.
6) Main Ideas and Details:
Place main ideas on a
balloon or ball.  Main ideas could
include transportation, colors, vacation spots and so forth.  Have the students pass the balloon or
ball to one another, and instruct them to say aloud the main idea that they
see.  Then ask them to provide a detail
that would be properly categorized under that main idea.  Players can not repeat a detail that has
already been used.  If they do,
they are out of the game.
Mindfulness Activities and Keepsakes
7) What I Learned:  Have the students sit in
a circle facing one another. 
Explain that the only person who can speak is the one holding the
ball.  Toss the ball to one of your
students and ask them to share the most important thing they learned over the
school year.  When they are
finished talking, have them toss the ball to another student.  Continue until all the students have an
opportunity to share their thoughts.
8) My Favorite Lessons:  
Have the students sit in a
circle facing one another.  Explain
that the only person who can speak is the one holding the ball.  Toss the ball to one of your students
and ask them to share their favorite lesson from the whole school year.  Ask them to also share why they like it
so much.  When they are finished
talking, have them toss the ball to another student.  Continue until all the students have an opportunity to share
their thoughts.
9) What I Like About Me and You:
Have the students sit in a
circle facing one another.  Explain
that the only person who can speak is the one holding the ball.  Toss the ball to one of your students
and ask them to share one thing that they like about themselves and one thing
that they like about the person who tossed them the ball.  When they are finished talking, have them
toss the ball to another student. 
Continue until all the students have an opportunity to share their
thoughts.
10) Memory Balls: Give each student a blank inflatable ball, such as a beach ball.  Provide permanent markers and let the
students go around and sign each other’s balls.  They can leave short messages too.  Be sure to say that all messages must be positive. 
11) Why I’m “Special” Balls:  Before
you begin this activity, ask your students to help you create a list of
positive adjectives that can describe people.  Place this list where all the students can see it.  Now, give each of your students a blank
beach ball or balloon.  Provide
permanent markers and have the students go around and write a positive
adjective that describes the person on the ball or balloon to whom it belongs.   Encourage the students to come up
with unique adjectives by looking at each ball and coming up with something
new. 
If you would like to learn about some
of my other popular games.  Go to: http://goodsensorylearning.com
There, you can even download freebies on some of my product pages.
I hope you enjoy these games!!  I
would love to hear you thoughts.
Cheers, Erica
Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to www.goodsensorylearning.com  www.dyslexiamaterials.com and  www.learningtolearn.biz 

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10 Strategies that Transform Passive Learners into Active Learners

Students’
forearms prop heavy heads and eye lids become fatigued and weighty. Information fills the room, but
the restless audience remains impervious as attention is stolen by fleeting thoughts
and boredom.  If this is a common
scene at your school, most likely the learning environment is passive.  Although a passive learning environment
can accommodate large numbers of students, it is often an ineffective scholastic
milieu.  In contrast, an active
learning environment should have the opposite effect on students.  This way of teaching encourages
creativity, self directed learning, mindfulness, interaction, discussion and
multisensory ways of processing. 

So what can I do to nurture active learning?
1)  
Help your students understand the difference
between active and passive learning.
2)  
Encourage your students to complete the free
Passive vs. Active Learning Profile offered free here.
3)  
Let your students brainstorm things they can do
to become active learners. 
4)  
Allow your students to brainstorm things you can
do to help them become active learners.
5)  
Integrate active learning activities into the
classroom such as acting, small group work and hands on activities.
6)  
Incorporate fun learning stations in the
classroom, so that the students can move around and process with other peers in
smaller groups.
7)  
Encourage students to preview new topics by
watching YouTube clips or doing internet searches so that they come to class
with some prior knowledge.
8)  
Give students assignment options so that they
can make a choice on how they would like to demonstrate their mastery of the
content.  Make sure the different
options tap into different learning modalities. 
9)  
Consider the 12 ways of learning and teach in a multisensory fashion.
10)  Break the class into groups where they take
opposing positions on a topic. 
Allow one student from each group to facilitate the discussion.  The teacher can act as the judge and
can dole out points for good arguments, creative content and clever
presentations. 
If you found this blog and activity to be helpful, this is
just one of the many resources available in the publication, Planning, Time Management and Organization for Success: Quick and Easy Approaches to Mastering Executive Functioning Skills for Students

Cheers,  Erica
Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to www.goodsensorylearning.com  www.dyslexiamaterials.com and  www.learningtolearn.biz 

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Podcast

Go Dyslexia Episode 8: Dyslexia: Building Vocabulary & Semantic Skills with Infercabulary

This is Dr. Erica Warren’s 12th Go Dyslexia video podcast: Dyslexia: Building Vocabulary and Semantic Skills with Infercabulary, featuring Guest Beth Lawrence and Host Dr. Erica Warren.

https://youtu.be/WVZkHFXPKo8

This video podcast shares my most recent interview featuring dyslexia expert Beth Lawrence, MA, CCC-SLP. Beth is an Orton Gillingham trained, certified speech-language pathologist, and CEO of Communication Apptitude (dba InferCabulary and WordQuations).

This is the 12th of many free video podcasts for Go Dyslexia!   During the video podcast, Beth and I talk about Infercabulary, a fun and multisensory online site that offers vocabulary and semantic reasoning development exercises and assessments. Beth talks about the importance of developing language skills and also provides a quick description of her app, WordQuations and assessment, Test of Semantic Reasoning.

What is Infercabulary? Infercabulary is a fun online site that develops the language skills semantic reasoning and vocabulary.  Instead of asking students to memorize complex language-definitions, students can now learn to use semantic reasoning skills to actively infer the meaning of words based on seeing five images of the word used in different contexts.  The activities use visual and audio cues to present lessons and game-like assessments that make the process both fun and memorable.  I have now implemented this software into my own private practice for session activities as well as home-fun assignments (I don’t give homework, I give optional home-fun suggestions). The best parts is I can track my student’s progress and growth. This is a dynamic tool that can be used by parents, teachers, learning specialists, reading specialist, educational therapists and more.

Get 30% off Infercabulary: If you would like to purchase Infercabulary, they are offering a special promotion for my audience.  Simply use coupon code GoDyslexia at checkout to receive 30% off!

Important Links Mentioned in this Podcast:

URL to Video Podcast: https://youtu.be/WVZkHFXPKo8

This is Dr. Erica Warren’s 12th Go Dyslexia video podcast: Dyslexia: Building Vocabulary and Semantic Skills with Infercabulary, featuring Guest Beth Lawrence and Host Dr. Erica Warren.

https://youtu.be/WVZkHFXPKo8

This video podcast shares my most recent interview featuring dyslexia expert Beth Lawrence, MA, CCC-SLP. Beth is an Orton Gillingham trained, certified speech-language pathologist, and CEO of Communication Apptitude (dba InferCabulary and WordQuations).

This is the 12th of many free video podcasts for Go Dyslexia!   During the video podcast, Beth and I talk about Infercabulary, a fun and multisensory online site that offers vocabulary and semantic reasoning development exercises and assessments. Beth talks about the importance of developing language skills and also provides a quick description of her app, WordQuations and assessment, Test of Semantic Reasoning.

What is Infercabulary? Infercabulary is a fun online site that develops the language skills semantic reasoning and vocabulary.  Instead of asking students to memorize complex language-definitions, students can now learn to use semantic reasoning skills to actively infer the meaning of words based on seeing five images of the word used in different contexts.  The activities use visual and audio cues to present lessons and game-like assessments that make the process both fun and memorable.  I have now implemented this software into my own private practice for session activities as well as home-fun assignments (I don’t give homework, I give optional home-fun suggestions). The best parts is I can track my student’s progress and growth. This is a dynamic tool that can be used by parents, teachers, learning specialists, reading specialist, educational therapists and more.

Get 30% off Infercabulary: If you would like to purchase Infercabulary, they are offering a special promotion for my audience.  Simply use coupon code GoDyslexia at checkout to receive 30% off!

Important Links Mentioned in this Podcast:

URL to Video Podcast: https://youtu.be/WVZkHFXPKo8

Audio version from iTunes:

Come Check out all my Video Podcasts: https://godyslexia.com/dyslexia-podcasts/

Come check out my Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/warrenerica1

Online store: http://www.goodsensorylearning.com/

YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCClFD…

Monthly Newsletter: http://bit.ly/1CYVT79

Learning Specialist Courses: http://www.learningspecialistcourses….

Private practice: http://learningtolearn.biz

Blog: http://learningspecialistmaterials.bl…

Dyslexia resources: http://www.dyslexiamaterials.com

Dyslexia video podcast, video blogs, & resources: https://www.godyslexia.com

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